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5 Websites to Study High School Math

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Attention, high school math lovers. High school math haters, you can listen up, too. Whether you're studying for your next big math test in school and just can't seem to nail the concepts with the worksheets and textbook, or you're a home school or virtual student looking for a little more math help, you can get quite a bit out of these five websites. They can really help push your geometry, algebra, trigonometry and calculus skills up to par. One even offers you math-related research project and science fair ideas!

Along with basic math skills explanations, a few of these websites offer puzzles, games and manipulatives to help clarify those tough concepts, which is perfect for every kind of learner out there. Ready to dive in? Take a peek at these websites designed to take those mathematical concepts from the obscure to the concrete.

Try These Cool, At-Home Science Experiments

Hooda Math

Hooda Math
Hooda Math

I have to confess; the math games seem boring on here at first, but when you really get to playing them, they test your skills in a way that ensures you will not be getting off the computer soon. Don't believe me? Go to the "Purple Trouble" Physics game and try to stop playing it once you get to Level 10. Impossible. You want to keep trying. These math quiz-builders test your mathematics skills in a very tangible way. From dressing a princess with multiplication to keeping the green blocks floating in the sky with your physics skills, your math skills, in all arenas, will be challenged in a completely addictive way.

Math that's fun? I'll take a second helping, please!

Math for Morons Like Us

Math for Morons Like Us
Math for Morons Like Us

This site was started through the Think Quest program, so students just like you created it and maintain it. That doesn't mean that the website is any less fantastic than if a group of teachers had put it together. The site offers a wealth of mathematics help. On the left side of the page, you'll find the "Learn" column. This portion is helpful for brushing up on concepts you may not have gotten the first time around in school. On the right side of the page, you'll find an "Interact" column, which is where you'll find the message boards to ask questions, lists of formulas, quizzes and a stellar math links.

Figure This!

Copyright Flickr User foundphotos1

Okay, so this website was designed by math teachers: The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Do not be fooled into thinking that it'll be a horrible learning experience, though. These teachers knew what they were doing. Amazing, huh? I know. Sometimes teachers really do understand how to help students. On this website, you can choose whether to study by types of challenges or math concepts. Here's what you do:

  1. Select a challenge or math concept.
  2. Attempt to answer the problem presented on your own.
  3. If you're stuck, go to "Getting Started" to give you hints on where to begin solving or click on the "Hint" to give you a clue.
  4. Click on "Answer" to check your work.

The challenges range from linear equations and functions to probability and statistics with geometry and measurement in between.

National Library of Virtual Manipulatives

Abacus
Getty Images | Yasuhide Fumoto

This website is a kinesthetic learner's dream come true. It's difficult for high school students who need to experience, sense and move to get tough mathematical concepts into their heads sometimes, especially in a setting that might not meet their learning needs. Are you one of those students? These virtual manipulatives can help! They offer explanations of math concepts in a hands-on way. You can drag beads on the online abacus, solve interesting puzzles by moving around the components and create graphs, patterns and mazes to analyze and explore data. The manipulatives allow you to see exactly what the math means behind the equation, which is oh-so-helpful when you're stuck.

Math Research Projects

numbers
Getty Images | Creative Crop

If it's your junior or senior year and you've been assigned the thrilling task of coming up with a math-based research project, but you are at a complete loss about how to even start, then take a peek at the website above. On the website, which is really just a list of ideas, you'll find a wealth of high school math project ideas suitable for a math-based science fair project or senior project. Here are a couple:

  1. Mazes: Is there an algorithm for getting out of 2-dimensional mazes? What about 3-dimensional? Look at the history of mazes. How would you go about finding someone who is lost in a maze (2 or 3 dimensional) and wandering randomly? How many people would you need to find him or her?
  2. Kaleidoscopes: Construct a kaleidoscope. Investigate its history and the mathematics of symmetry.
  3. The Art Gallery problem: What is the least number of guards required to watch over all paintings in an art gallery? The guards are positioned at specific locations and collectively must have a direct line of sight to every point on the walls.
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